A WELL-KNOWN indigenous Australian was sent an envelope, and scrawled on the front was her name followed by the words “dirty black abbo”.

The story of Nova Peris, an Australian athlete and former politician, is one of many horrific tales that have emerged on Harmony Day under the social media hashtag #FreedomOfSpeech.

The trending hashtag was started by Australian author and journalist Benjamin Law, who asked Australians to share their stories in the wake of a significant freedom of speech ruling.

(source: heraldsun.com.au)

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Fincantieri, team of Palermo, they are tight around Amara Touré, 14 year old native of Mali (now alone in Sicily after crossing the Mediterranean), targeted last week during the game with Dattilo team. The "no" to racism experienced by the children of Fincantieri with an initiative much symbolic as practical, accompanied by a slogan that is worth a thousand words: "We are all Amara." 

(the following article is in italian)

(source: PalermoToday)

Più della sanzione però fa notizia il “no” al razzismo manifestato dai ragazzi della Fincantieri con un’iniziativa tanto simbolica quanto concreta, accompagnata da uno slogan che vale mille parole: "Siamo tutti Amara".

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Racial incidents that have always characterized the Italian football

(the following article is in italian)

(source: napolisport.net)

Il calcio, soprattutto in Italia, è considerato una delle massime espressioni sportive, ma talvolta viene lui stesso messo a repentaglio, diventando oggetto di polemiche e casi nazionali. In particolare, gli stessi stadi di calcio sono diventati amplificatori di questioni e problematiche già del tutto mature all’interno della nostra società.

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"Recent political developments have revived discussions on racism. But did we ever see the ‘end of racism’? Drawing on extensive research on the historical articulations of racism across Europe, Katy Sian explains how in the post-racial society, debates on anti-racism became invisible. This confusion allowed racism to grow unchecked". (source: lse.ac.uk)
What's your opinion? Do you agree with Katy Sian?

 

Between 2010 and 2013, when myself and colleagues at the University of Leeds were exploring the semantics of racism and anti-racism across Europe, there was a growing sense that racism was a problem that had been more or less resolved. In the UK, this enunciation of the post-racial came with a subjective definition in the Stephen Lawrence enquiry and the Macpherson report. Through the definition that a racist incident referred ‘to any incident that was perceived to be racist by the victim or any other person’, white people paradoxically came to represent the largest group of victims of racial violence. This counterintuitive conclusion reflected how the shift in the definition of racism removed the structural dimensions of power and, as a consequence, racism became fungible.

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